A WOMAN WAS WAITING FOR…

 late

 

A woman was waiting for her flight at airport.

She bought a bag of cookies, found a place to drop and took out her book. She started to read and suddenly noticed that a man, sitting beside her, grabbed a cookie from her bag. She just tried to ignore this.

So she munched cookies and at the same time watched how shameless cookie thief was diminishing her stocks. She thought to herself: „If I wasn‘t such a nice person, I would blacken his eye“.

When only one cookie was left, she looked with interest and wondered what he would do. He smiled, took the last cookie and broke it in half. She thought: „This guy is so rude, he didn‘t even show any gratitude!”

After her flight was called, the woman gathered her baggage and headed to gate. She took her seat in the plane, and started to look for her book, which was almost complete. As she reached her baggage, she gasped with surprise, as there was an unopened bag of cookies. A dreadful thought crossed her mind: „If my cookie bag is here, the other one was his and he just tried to share. She realized that she was the rude one, but it was too late to apologize.

http://www.inspirationalstories.eu/stories/amazing-stories/good-stories-with-morals/

 

God will make a way

DON MOEN LYRICS

god will make a way

“God Will Make A Way”
Where there seems to be no way
He works in ways we cannot see
He will make a way for me

He will be my guide
Hold me closely to His side
With love and strength for each new day
He will make a way, He will make a way

Oh, God will make a way
Where there seems to be no way
He works in ways we cannot see
He will make a way for me

He will be my guide
Hold me closely to His side
With love and strength for each new day
He will make a way, He will make a way

By a roadway in the wilderness, He’ll lead me
And rivers in the desert will I see
Heaven and Earth will fade but His Word will still remain
And He will do something new today

Oh, God will make a way
Where there seems to be no way
He works in ways we cannot see
He will make a way for me

He will be my guide
Hold me closely to His side
With love and strength for each new day
He will make a way, He will make a way

By a roadway in the wilderness, He’ll lead me
And rivers in the desert will I see
Heaven and Earth will fade but His Word will still remain
And He will do something new today

Oh, God will make a way
Where there seems to be no way
He works in ways we cannot see
He will make a way for me

He will be my guide
Hold me closely to His side
With love and strength for each new day
He will make a way, He will make a way

With love and strength for each new day
He will make a way, He will make a way

Hilarious Origin of Names of Towns and Locations in Kenya

Posted by Jambo on Saturday, April 19, 2014

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Kenya is home to many trading centers and towns some with very interesting names, but have you ever thought of how the name of your town or village came about? Some of the names came about by what we can term as sheer coincidence and twists which are funny.

Dagoretti Corner: The place was originally known as “The Great Corner” and the Africans could not pronounce it correctly and the corrupted version became Dagoretti Corner which was directly from The Great Corner which has stuck to this day. The Great Corner was the site of the first airfield in Kenya; a patchy grass runway around the present Meteorological Department.

Image

Rumuruti: Rumuruti is a town in Laikipia County about 40km north of Nyahururu. How did it get its’ name? The town was on the route from Nyahururu to Mararal which was commonly used by white settlers. They referred to the trail between the two settlements as a “Remote route”. The corrupted version of this then became Rumuruti, the town name as we know it today. Rumuruti was the site of a huge meteor shower in 1934 and some of them are on sale on e-bay http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_trksid=p2050601.m570.l1313.TR0.TRC0.Xrumuruti&_nkw=rumuruti&_sacat=0&_from=R40

Thogoto: The Church of Scotland Mission was the first mission to settle in the now little town near Kikuyu in Kiambu County. The local Kikuyu Community could not pronounce the name Scotland easily and they would pronounce it as “Thigoto” and thus the name Thogoto was born. Today the town has maintained the name Thogoto and that PCEA Church of the Torch one of the oldest mission churches still stands.

Kapropita: This is a town in the former Rift Valley in Baringo County. A settler known as Corporal Peter lived in the area during the pre-independence period. His name was a tough one for the locals to pronounce and the area soon was referred as Kapropita which is a corrupted version of Corporal Peter.

Kabarnet:  It’s believed that the town is named after a French man known as Barnet who settled in the area and made it his home. The local Tugen people then started to refer to the place as Ka- Barnet. The word “Ka” means “the homestead of” and therefore the name Ka-Barnet means the place/home of Barnet.

Rod-Kopany: Is a busy town  in Homa-Bay County. During the construction of a road in the area the Mehta Singh Road Company the residents would refer to it as Rodi Kopany. This name quickly stuck and the town was known as Rod-Kopany which is a corruption of the name Road Company.

Kirigiti: There was a popular cricket field in Kiambu and it was popular with settlers who would frequent the place from surrounding farms. The local Kikuyu community could not pronounce the name Cricket and they pronounced it as Kirigiti. Today the stadium is referred to as Kirigiti which is just a version of Cricket but with a Kikuyu corruption to it. Mzee Jomo Kenyatta held his last rally at Kirigiti stadium before the declaration of emergency in 1952.

Roysambu: Roysambu is a suburb along the Thika superhighway in Nairobi City County. The place was known as “Royal Suburbs” during the colonial times. However the Africans in Nairobi pronounced it as Roy-Sabu and thus it got the name “Roysambu”.

Kariakor: During the First World War a contingent of Africans were in the British army as carrying luggage. The Carrier Corps, as they were known, carried everything the soldiers needed to survive during the East African Campaign of the First World War. Their base in Nairobi was around the present day Kariakor area. The locals simply called the place Carrier corps which with a local dialect influence sounded like “Kariako” and it’s today still called by that name.

Tenwek: Is a shopping centre located in Bomet County and location of one of the oldest hospitals in the region which was built in 1936. The name Tenwek is believed to have come about because it took ten weeks to travel from the Mombasa to the area by foot.

Matayos: In the county of Busia there is a trading called Matayos. According to the residents of Busia a European by the name Mathew moved to the area during the colonial times. The residents referred to him as “Mathayo” which is the Kiswahili version of Mathew. However, in Luhya dialect the name was pronounced as “Matayo”. Today Matayos is one of the new constituencies in Busia.

While many of these were English names corrupted into local dialects, there are a number of places in Kenya where local names were Anglicized by the European settlers.

Msongari: The name was Muthangari and an area in Lavington still maintains that name. The name was a bit tuff for the settlers and they pronounced it as “Msongari”.

shared by Silvano Obunge Ochuodho (Fr.)

Story

***A MUST READ LIFE STORY****

angel
There was a day a man entered bus..
Suddenly a mad man ran to the
bus, pointed at the man and said
“MAD MAN COME DOWN” Everybody was surprised and was laughing at the man, the mad man came again and pointed to this young man and shouted “MAD MAN I SAID COME DOWN” Again everybody started
laughing at the mad man who is calling a normal young man a mad man. Now the bus was full with passengers and was about to
kick off when again the 3rd time
the mad man ran to the man and shouted “MADDDD!!! MANNN I SAID U SHOULD COME DOWN YOU DON’T WANT TO HEAR I WILL KICK U DOWN MY SELF IF U DON’T COME DOWN NOW”
The passengers became angry wit the man for bringing nd making a man man shout on them
The man became angry nd told the
driver to allow him down.
and he alighted right there nd decided not to go where he was going anymore
At last the bus set off,he didn’t find the mad man anymore around
Not less than 20 mins later it was
announced that the bus had gotten a severe accident and all the passengers had died including the driver nd conductor.
He started flowing down tears and praising lord for sending down his angels to escape him from death.
God can operate in anything or anybody!

Reflection No. 21042016

Acts 13:13-25; John 13:16-20

Paul and Barnabas continue their first missionary journey. From Paphos on the north coast of Cyprus they set off for Perga, the capital of the province of Pamphylia. Pamphylia was a coastal province in Asia Minor, between provinces of Lydia and Cilicia on the south coast of modern Turkey. It was 8 km (5 miles) inland and 20 km (12 miles) east of the important seaport of Attalia.

At this point, John Mark, who had originally been one of the party, returned to Jerusalem. Maybe John Mark was having homesickness. Paul will express his dissatisfaction with John’s behaviour.

As usual, on arriving in Antioch, the two missionaries went to the local synagogue on the sabbath. The synagogue provided a readymade starting point with a building, regular meetings and people who were familiar with the Scriptures.

After the reading of the scriptures, as was the custom, they were invited by the synagogue officials to speak to the assembly. It might be very profitable for each one us to look back over our own lives and see how God’s providence has been at work at various key points.

Today we begin today the second part of John’s gospel, sometimes known as the “Book of Glory” (chaps 13-20), covering Jesus’ passion, death and resurrection. Today’s passage immediately follows on the washing of his disciples’ feet by Jesus.

It is in that context that he says, “No slave is greater than his master; no messenger outranks the one who sent him.” With these words Jesus clearly urges his followers to serve each other in the same way that he, their Lord and Master, served them by the symbolic act of washing their feet. It was an act only done by the slaves in the household.

Jesus has given service to others a dignity which is totally independent of the status that society confers on people, dividing them into served and server. Jesus’ whole raison d’etre for being among us was to serve. “Blessed will you be if you put this into practice.” It is a truth which many of us – clergy, religious and laity – do not always find it easy to practise consistently.

It would not be quite right to see Jesus washing his disciples’ feet as a humbling of himself. Service in the Gospel is primarily love in action. Love (agape, ‘agaph) is the desire for the well-being of the other. That love is actualised by service, by the doing of acts for the good of the other. It is the act of brothers and sisters to and for each other. Status or position does not enter into it.

At the same time Jesus gives the first warning that there is one among them to whom these words will not apply. It is to prepare them for the prediction about his betrayal by one of the group. “The one who has shared my bread has raised his heel against me.” To share bread together was a mark of close fellowship and that is a primary meaning of the Eucharist which is a “breaking of bread” among the members of a close community. To ‘lift up the heel’ may refer a horse kicking or the shaking off of dust from one’s feet as sign of rejection.

Far from being shocked and disturbed by what is going to happen, they should be aware that everything that Jesus willingly undergoes in coming days is clear proof of his divine origin. “I tell you this now, before it takes place, so that when it takes place you may believe that I AM.”

For what is going to happen to Jesus is the ultimate act of service to his brothers and sisters. It is the greatest love that can be shown. Now they are being asked to hold on to Jesus’ identity as one with the Father even when they see him die in shame and disgrace on the cross.

In fact, their faith will be deeply shaken and will not be confirmed until after Pentecost.

Finally, anyone who accepts a disciple or messenger of Jesus, accepts both Jesus himself and the Father who sent him. There is a clear line of unity emanating from the Father going through the Son and passing through the disciple to others. There is just one mission – to bring about the Kingdom, the Reign of God in the world.

This acceptance is done by our sharing fully in Jesus’ own attitude of service, even to the giving of his life.